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, present-day india, the ching dynasty, temporary china, and the tokugawa shogunate in japan. each of these fears had its own way of governing on its own cultural and political approach to commerce, and order. if you fast-forward about 100, 120 years to the 19th century, the world changed dramatically. power had shifted from the west and the south to the north. and by 1815, the end of the napoleonic wars, europe had pulled ahead of the rest of the world. and the industrial revolution and the development of the steam engine and the development of steel and battleships, and the telegraph and underground, the underwater submarine cable enabled europe, not just to be the most powerful place in the world, but to extend its reach globally. and by the end of the 19th century, europe had either colonized or had already de- colonized 90% of the world landmass. and we have been living in the world since 1815 dominated by the west. economically, politically and ideologically. first it was europe, then europe handed over the baton to the united states after pearl harbor, and roughly 1815 until
of his war policy, it would not reach those people. in annual growth in india of 1%. indians understand what this order was all about. they wanted the confusion of independence. from may, 1947 is important because it is the modern 1776. america is the oldest country of the modern world. the american constitution provided us with the template for classless democracy. it was not achieved immediately, but it was the template. india is important in 1947 because india is the oldest nation of the post-colonial world. the indian constitution creates an ideological template for democracy. with the emergence of india, china had a different template. very interesting, we see these comparisons, two parties, congress and the chinese communist party, became the dominant force in the post independents space. both had to be discriminated because both came from economically driven needs. the chinese offered autocratic left. but had karimov -- charismatic leaders. long story short,ke i i'm waiting for the short part. >> just a little bit longer. both had charismatic leaders, but i [indiscernible] but re
and look at the issues that have to do with pakistan's relationship to india the issues that have to do with the sequence of events that will take place after 2014 when the american focus once again as steve mentioned, when the american focus become somewhat less on our relationship to counterterrorism and opens the door for more creative ways of business, academic, media and other links with pakistan that has suffered in last 10 years because of our focus. i guess i come out out of your question answering that i'm cautiously optimistic that there were two things on the rails which if you know what happened over the last two years is not an easy thing. it was kind of like rolling down the side of the -- with rocks and cactus is is an you don't know how far the ripping go so when i see these keeping things on track it's not easy to keep things on track and pakistan is the way it is mismanaged and the difficulties in our relationship but if we are able to do so after 2014 there will be a prospect that we can open up to new kinds of cooperation if we are not slaves to a bilateral vision ba
-cholesterol drug is being recalled by its manufacturer because it may be contaminated. india-based drugmaker ranbaxy says a total of 41 lots of its generic version of lipitor may contain tiny glass particles. the recall is voluntary and with the knowledge of the fda. this is the same company that came under fire in 2006 and 2008 because of poor conditions of two of its plants in india. >>> in bangladesh they're trying to figure out what caused that deadly fire at a crowded clothing factory. last night the fire ripped through this nine-story building with 2,000 people inside. at least 117 people were killed and 200 injured. many jumped for their lives. cnn international anchor jonathan mann is here with more on this. this is not the first time a fire has happened of this magnitude at a plant or factory in that region. >> in that region, in that industry. bangladesh has thousands of factories making, sad to say, making the clothing a lot of people are buying this weekend. they export a lot of clothing to us. it's a massive earner for the country. but they have lost hundreds of workers in just
it actually happened. >> glor: charlie d'agata, thank you. in india, the one attacker who survived the 2008 terror rampage in mumbai was executed today. ajmal kasab was hanged after his plea for clemency was rejected. four years ago, kasab and nine other members of the pakistani terror group tore through mumbai with grenades and automatic weapons. during a three-day siege, they killed 166 people. in this country, illinois congressman jesse jackson, jr., resigned today, just two weeks ago he was reelected in a landslide even though he hadn't spent a minute on the campaign trail and was under an ethics investigation. he is now under a criminal investigation. chip reid has more on a man who was once one of the democrats' rising stars. >> reporter: in his letter of resignation to speaker of the house john boehner, jackson wrote, "my health issues and treatment regimen have become incompatible with service in the house of representatives." the son of civil rights leader jesse jackson, jackson, jr., mysteriously disappeared from public view last june. it was later revealed he was undergoing treat
. the president was visiting pagodas in the far east. lou: not going near india or china. you mentioned a moss, ron and syria along with egypt in that, if you will, axes with in the least. syria itself, the implications for it as a result of what we are witnessing and the obvious victory for iran in brokering this deal along with more see, whether he is the ultimate act or whether he is, if you will, acting in the interest of others >> this war in the region is really a proxy war between iran and israel. this is really extending to hezbollah and moss. these rockets that were fired iranian rockets supplied by a iranians. lou: most of them by israel. >> absolutely. but these were -- derived from the power. there is no doubt about that. >> in the bunker, these are good days. these are good days. no one came to the rescue. indeed, the talks in egypt in the tumult of the war between israel and the moss. no doubt about it. lou: thank you for being here. >> thank you. lou: next russia's leading newspaper on president obama and those who voted for him not flattering. noted obama backer seemingly worki
to the u.s. ambassador to india, and executive secretary for the indo-u.s. sub-commission on education and culture. but even more impressive than his resume, is his obvious passion and commitment to fostering essential debate about tough issues. please join me now in welcoming dr. bouton, who, unfortunately for the chicago council, will be leaving there sometime next year. marshall will tell us more about the results of the fascinating new survey, will offer keynote remarks, and then we'll move to the panel. please welcome marshall bouton. [applause] marshall bouton: thank you jane very much. we're thrilled, we're honored, in fact the wilson center has agreed to partner with us in hosting the release of the council's 2012 study. this is a great institution now, very, very capably led by jane and we're delighted to have this opportunity to collaborate with you early in your tenure. so i have a really tough job and that is to try to present the findings of a rather exhaustive study of american thinking about u.s. foreign policy. i'm looking forward very much to the panel and to their com
in mississippi and alabama when they are actually competing with kids in china and india. we must bring our standards up. i talked about career education. more heavy stigmatized of vocational education? there are -- why haev we stigmatized of vocational education. there are kids who do not want to go to harvard. this should be in industries certification in a career like that. all these things matter. i will conclude by saying this frustration out there is real. from some people on my son of the aisle -- so many people on my side of the aisle, i have heard people say things i will mica in baltimore. i will focus on my family and community and the politics to others. others have suggested the american electorate has changed. i cannot believe that is true. i cannot believe that is true. if it is true, the very nature of our country has changed forever. that cannot happen. i cannot believe that is true. i the most are like my parents. all the what is a job that pays them enough money so they can buy a house, take their kids on a trip every once in awhile, do something they enjoyed in life, and
company. they are moving it everywhere. india, china, people drinking whisky like mad. >> big deal with india in the past couple of weeks. >> i met with my friend johnny walker black over the weekend. >> how is johnny doing? >> it was at a wedding. he is always there. >> he's a great guy. he should meet by buddy jim beam. >> what's on mad tonight? >> we'll talk about fiscal cliff saying, listen, here's what happens if we solve it. i think this rally today is about solving it. and i'm going to present the world view that is going to be just unbelievable if we get this thing solved which would make a lot of stocks go up dramatically including apple where we would finally get a sense that maybe it's not worth selling because the capital gains tax may not rise that much. >> on friday night intraday was 505. this morning we're creeping up to 548, 550 here. >> i tried to get into the apple store yesterday. apple does have products you want. do they have i-tv? you don't need it because stock is down 20%. i think that apple is a clarity stock. that's the big issue that i'm using for fiscal
on the other. states like that -- north korea, pakistan, india, i guess the argument could be made to a certain degree, israel. they are driven to an extent -- certainly by profound insecurity and the notion, which is elevated to a level of one of the 10 commandments in this time, that the way to really get iran is getting rid of -- and it also generates paradoxical implications that the more threatened -- if assad's fall and sense of encirclement and the besieged quality of ron's neighborhood -- simple -- you ron's neighborhood, a simple man that i am, is going to accelerate program,clear weapons and not make them more reasonable. this is a conclusion that is impossible to attack or unwind, and yet it is obviously critical to the discussion of what to do. >> i think the dilemma to the outside world is do we have the talent, the skill to persuade iranian leaders that the acquisition of nuclear materials is secure? there are those who would make the argument that aaron is making. if you look at world experience in the 20th century, having nuclear weapons is a status symbol and literally a deterr
communication technologies will tie together, and these are quotes, tied together indian in india, chicago and the congo. that speech, newt minow's insights, were inspirational to me when i first read them 20 years ago. and the fact is they helped inform today how the fcc thinks about new communication technologies. because the core messages from that speech are as relevant today as they were 50 years ago. the main difference of course is the primary new communication technology today is different. it's not broadcast tv or cable tv, satellite. it's broadband internet. so let's start with the opportunities around broadband. the benefits already being delivered by wired and wireless broadband are nothing short of extraordinary. we see here at home in the u.s. are it's no exaggeration to say that high speed internet is reshaping the u.s. economy. we can hardly imagine a world without google, facebook, twitter, amazon, wikipedia, without e-mail, texting, or the apple stores people are using to download 100 million apps a day. broadband is also transforming education, enabling distance learning
. after all it's less expensive to live in india where the stars of the movie end up going. i'm here to talk about an at native to youth nation i can't or out sourcing what soon will be a quarter of the population and to argue that the solution to much that ails us as individuals and as a society lace in rethinking the map of life. a map of life that was in many ways set up for three score and ten for those who seem like longer lives of the past century but is inadequate of five score life spans that more people will be living in the 21st century. half of the kids in the developed rgp world are projected to see their 100th birthday. so we can't just extend this life course that was set up for a very different ark of life to one that is really -- has an extra decimal point and and extra 0 to it. so i think what is happening is today that the nature of life is under every bit as radical a transformation as the numbers are. all those numbers that we're so familiar with. and that the period that's been characterized in these terms is actually an entirely new stage of life. 60 is not the
against the e.u. emissions trading scheme in new delhi, india. the last year there have been several other multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illegal scheme. the bill also directs appropriate u.s. government officials to negotiate a worldwide approach to address aircraft emissions and to take appropriate actions to hold u.s. civil operators harmless from the e.u. emissions trading scheme. the e.u. needs to slow down, carefully weigh its decision to include international civil aviation in its emissions trading scheme. a better approach would be to work with the international civil aviation community through the u.n. international civil aviation organization to establish consensus-driven initiatives to reduce airline emissions. i'm pleased to see movement on the part of the e.u. to work with international community at i.k.o. to seek a global approach to civil aviation emissions. wh
tragic death may be lost too. >> some key information is missing. >> reporter: praveen met in india, married and set up home in ireland four years ago. he is an engineer. she was a dentist. they were happy here. >> she loved dancing. she forced me to dance with her on a couple of times on the stage, when she gave her performance. and that will be the fondest memories, i suppose, you know. i always had stage fear. and the belief she gave me. it was unbelievable. >> reporter: together, they had dreams of a beautiful future, of children, their children, of having a family. >> she was looking forward, basically you know. in a way she found that, you know, she's at the right place, you know, that's the reason she knew and she was very well organized as well, you know? she knew what she wanted in life. that's the reason why she decided to settle here long-term. >> reporter: when she became pregnant, they were overjoyed. then their ordeal began. she got back pain. here doctors told her she was miscarrying. her baby would likely die. her husband says they asked for a termination, were told
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)